Lews Castle College Maritime Department will be offering the following Short Courses, at the Stornoway Campus from September 2021.

All one day classes run on Fridays, from 0900, to 1700.

Sea Survival/Personal Survival Techniques (£110) –01st Oct, 10th Dec, 7th Jan
https://www.lews.uhi.ac.uk/courses/certificate-personal-survival-techniques-stcw-table-a-v1-11/

STCW Elementary First Aid(EFA) (£110) –22nd Oct, 21st Jan
https://www.lews.uhi.ac.uk/courses/certificate-first-aid-elementary-stcw/
(The three day “First Aid at Work” is available on request.)

RYA SRC / VHF (£150) – 08th Oct, 12th Nov, 17th Dec, 14th Jan
https://www.rya.org.uk/courses-training/courses/specialist/Pages/src.aspx

Personal Safety, and Social Responsibilities (PSSR) (£100) – 24th Sep, 19th Nov, 21st Jan
https://www.lews.uhi.ac.uk/courses/certificate-personal-safety-and-social-responsibilities-stcw/

Arrangements can be made for additional courses, for group bookings of 6, or more, as and when demand dictates.

For additional details please contact:
Iain Angus Macaulay: Tel- 01851770287, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Alistair Macleod: Tel-01851770284, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lews Castle College: Tel – 01851770000

 

The Uist Virtual Archaeology Project is delighted to launch its brand-new App, Uist Unearthed. Created and led by archaeologists from Lews Castle College UHI and supported by Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, the project aims to encourage communities and visitors to download the app and explore seven of Uist’s most significant archaeological sites.

From well-preserved Neolithic burial tombs to one of the largest Viking trading posts in Scotland, Uist is home to hundreds of spectacular archaeological sites. Offering Access courses through to postgraduate degrees, Lews Castle College UHI presents an amazing opportunity to study these diverse and internationally significant locations in stunning landscapes with leading experts.

To mark Mental Health Awareness Week, Module Leader Child & Adolescent Mental Health Hereward Proops shares his story.

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Hereward Proops is a LCC UHI lecturer who teaches on a variety of courses including our CPD Award in Child & Adolescent Mental Health 

We all know about the benefits of healthy living. From an early age, we are taught about the importance of exercise, a balanced diet and good hygiene. We know that if we look after our bodies, we reduce the risk of illness and we feel better in ourselves. People are not threatened by the word “health” and most people are willing to talk about it. However, place the word “mental” in front of it, and people may be much less willing to open up and share their experiences. 

Perhaps the word “mental” has negative connotations. As a child, I recall myself and my contemporaries using it as an adjective to describe something that was unreasoning, unreasonable, out-of-control or just plain crazy. Nobody wants to be seen as “mental” and this stigma is perhaps what is making it so difficult to engage in sensible, open discussion about “mental health”.

The reality is, mental health affects every single one of us. The word “mental” simply refers to aspects or functions of the mind. Very few people would claim that they don’t have a mind, so why should we feel unable to discuss it?